Rigger Qualifications from OSHA.gov

RIGGER QUALIFICATIONS   FROM F.A.Q. OSHA.GOV WEBSITE

  1. The standard requires that a rigger be a “qualified rigger” to perform certain tasks. What qualifications must a rigger possess to be a “qualified rigger?”
    A qualified rigger is a rigger who meets the criteria for a qualified person. A qualified rigger must therefore:

    • possess a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or have extensive knowledge, training, and experience, and
    • successfully demonstrate the ability to solve problems related to rigging loads.


A qualified rigger must be able to properly rig the load for a particular job. He or she need not be qualified to do every type of rigging job. Each load that requires rigging has unique properties that can range from the simple to the complex. However, previous experiences does not automatically qualify the rigger to rig unstable, unusually heavy, or eccentric loads that may require a tandem lift, multiple lifts, or use of custom rigging equipment. In essence, employers must make sure that the person can do the rigging work needed for the exact types of loads and lifts for a particular job with the equipment and rigging that will be used for that job.




  1. Does a certified operator also meet the requirements of a qualified rigger?
    A certified operator does not necessarily meet the requirements of a qualified rigger. The person designated as the qualified rigger must have the ability to properly rig the load for a particular job. A certified or qualified operator may meet the requirements of a qualified rigger, depending on the operator’s knowledge and experience with rigging. In general, the qualifications of a rigger and an equipment operator are not considered one in the same.
  2. Do qualified riggers have to be trained or certified by a third party?
    No. Riggers do not have to be certified by an accredited organization or assessed by a third party. Employers may choose to use a third party entity to assess the qualifications of the rigger candidate, but they are not required to do so.
  3. Must a “qualified rigger” carry documentation of his or her rigger qualifications?
    No. The employer must determine the qualifications of the rigger as applicable to the hoisting job to be performed. While documentation, such as a card from an assessing organization indicating that the individual has demonstrated specified skills, could serve as evidence of a rigger’s qualifications, Subpart CC of 29 CFR Part 1926 does not require that a rigger carry such documentation.

Basic difference between Certified, Competent or Qualified as a Rigger

The Difference Basic Competency, Qualification and/or Certification:            




COMPETENT RIGGER

o    BASIC RULES & REGULATIONS

o    SAFE WORKING LOADS – BASIC DOWNGRADE CALCULATIONS

o    KNOTS, HITCHES AND THEIR USES

o    RIGGING GEAR AND KNOW WHAT TO USE AND NOT TO USE 

CERTIFIED RIGGER – BASED ON WRITTEN EXAM AND PRACTICAL EXAM

o    VALIDATING THE PERSONS KNOWLEDGE

QUALIFIED RIGGER

A QUALIFIED RIGGER IS ABLE TO EXPLAIN

o    COMPLIES WITH STANDARDS THAT RECOGNIZES QUALIFICATION WHICH INCLUDES TRAINING

o    ACCOUNTABLE FOR CRANE SET UP, GEAR INSPECTION, RIG SET UP, SAFE WORKING LOAD CALCULATION, HOOK AND UN HOOK LOAD

o    CAN DEMONSTRATE THEIR EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE OF THE SUBJECT MATTER BY EXPLANATION AND CALCULATION



Basic description of a crane operator

A Basic Description of a crane operator   
Crane operators service and operate the hoist and swing equipment used to move machinery and/or parts and material at construction sites, industrial yards, ports and other locations. Crane operators manipulate a number of pedals and levers to rotate the crane, and raise and lower its boom and one or more load lines. They often perform all or some of these operations simultaneously. Crane operators use a number of different cranes to lift cargo, machinery and other objects to relocate erect or deconstruct. The weight that cranes carry is usually from a few thousand pounds to 10 tons or on occasion more than 100+ tons.

Boom truck operators operate hydraulic booms that are mounted on trucks and are capable of moving very heavy loads.  Accordingly, mobile crane operators service and operate booms which are mounted on crawlers or wheeled frames. 

used_rt_crane

 

What types of industries/career fields rig and use cranes?  

Ship Repair Industries ● Construction ● Long-shoring ● Utilities (Electric, Phone, Cable & Water) ● Landscaping ● Roofing ● Plumbing ● Building Maintenance ● Manufacturing Plants ● Power Plants ● Wastewater Facilities ● Roads Maintenance ● Steel Erection & Welding ● Oil Refineries ● Rail Transit & Transportation ● Elevator Maintenance and Installation ● HVAC Repair and Installation ● Solar Technology & Wind Turbines Installations and Repairs ● Etc

Demolition workers to be included in Final Crane Rule 2013 April

OSHA issues final rule to protect workers using cranes and derricks in
demolition and underground construction

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration today issued a final rule that applies the requirements of the August 2010 cranes and derricks in construction standard to demolition work and underground construction. Application of this rule will protect workers from hazards associated with hoisting equipment used during construction activities.

“It is important that construction workers in these sectors receive the same safety protections as other construction workers,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. “Extending this rule to demolition and underground construction work will help save lives and prevent injuries.”

This final rule applies the same crane rules to underground construction and demolition that are already being used by other construction sectors, and streamlines OSHA’s standards by eliminating the separate cranes and derricks standard currently used for underground and demolition work. The rule also corrects errors made to the underground construction and demolition standards in the 2010 rulemaking.

The final rule becomes effective May 23, 2013.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.